Technical Resources

Technical Resources

Technical Resources

Hot & Cold Stucco Walls

Submitted by Jim Nisted, DryVit Systems Inc.

Written by Mike Griffin, The Quikrete Companies

Originally published in Walls & Ceilings Magazine in August, 2013. Reproduced courtesay of BNP Media LLC.

 

Weather has a significant effect on the application requirements and nuances of plaster/stucco seasonally and it can sometimes be daily. Contributing factors are: temperature, humidity, wind and the exposure of the sun.

Every plasterer knows that plaster/stucco sets faster in the summer and slower in the winter. In this article the goal is to offer some helpful hints for the placement of plaster/stucco materials in both hot and cold conditions.

The Hygrothermal Performance of Exterior Wall Systems

This article was submitted by Jim Nisted, Dryvit Systems Inc.

The Hygrothermal Performance of Exterior Wall Systems:

Key Points of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory NET Facilities Research Project

Study Goals: The primary goals of the study are:

¢ To validate the moisture and thermal performance of EIFS wall systems

¢ To quantify the performance of EIFS over other types of exterior claddings

¢ To develop and calibrate a hygrothermal (moisture and temperature) computer model with the unique features of EIFS that will validate the computer model for all climatic regions

Read the full study!

Electrochromic Glazing as an Architectural Enabler

There is now indisputable evidence of the positive benefits of access to daylight on human health and well-being [1]. Access to daylight has been shown to significantly improve productivity and reduce absenteeism in office settings, increase student achievement in schools, and increase healing rates in healthcare environments [1]. It turns out that views to the outdoors may be even more important than daylight (although hard to separate). In fact views of nature, specifically, have been shown to reduce stress levels and improve mood [2]. The World Health Organization says that mental health disorders are expected to be the number two illness worldwide by 2020, and stress can be a major contributor [3].

The Code Corner Openings Part 2

by: Ronald L. Geren, AIA, CSI, CCS, CCCA, SCIP In Part 1, the importance of protecting openings was addressed with a focus on interior windows and doors. But opening protection is not limited to interior construction; openings in exterior walls are also subject to protection. Openings in Exterior Walls Protection requirements for openings located in exterior walls are determined in a manner completely different than that for interior openings. One of the most notable differences is that just because an exterior wall is required to be of fire-resistive construction does not mean that openings in that same wall are required to be protected.

The Code Corner - Openings Part I

by: Ronald L. Geren, AIA, CSI, CCS, CCCA, SCIP ÏThe act or an instance of becoming open or being made to open. ÏAn open space serving as a passage or gap. ÏAn unfilled job or position; a vacancy. ÏA breach or aperture.1 The word Ïopening has many meanings, as indicated above. However, with its many specific code-related definitions, it is surprising that theInternational Building Code(IBC)2does not provide its own definition of Ïopening. So, in the absence of a code-specific definition, the latter definition from the above list is very apt when referring to doors, windows, and other Ïbreaches in fire-resistance-rated assemblies.

The Code Corner - Gypsum Board Construction

by: Ronald L. Geren, AIA, CSI, CCS, CCCA, SCIP Gypsum board has been an important part of the construction industry for more than 100 years. Its humble beginnings started in the late 1800s as ÏSackett Board, named for Augustine Sackett, one of the inventors of the early gypsum product. Sackett Board consisted of Plaster of Paris between two layers of felt paper. The board was 1/4 inch thick and 36 inches square with exposed edges. Although not suitable as a finish product as is todays gypsum board, Sackett Board made an excellent base for gypsum plaster. In 1910 the evolution of gypsum board took another step forward when a process for wrapping the exposed edges was implemented in manufacturing.

 Applying the Building Code

Applying the Building Code: Step-by-Step Guidance for Design and Building Professionals (Building Codes Illustrated)

No other resource—not even the building code—presents the exact code information you need, when you need it at design stage

The International Building Code (IBC) is a model building code developed by the International Code Council (ICC). The IBC and its complementary codes provide design and construction professionals with a complete set of comprehensive, coordinated building safety and fire prevention regulations in order to safeguard the public health and general welfare of the occupants of new and existing buildings and structures. Adopted throughout most of the United States and its territories, it is referenced by federal agencies, such as the General Services Administration, National Park Service, Department of State, U.S. Forest Service, and the Department of Defense. For architects and other design and construction professionals, it is particularly important that they understand how to apply the IBC and how code officials view buildings, so that they integrate code-required provisions in the earliest design stages of any project.

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